Tested by experts
headphones

Shure SE112 Headphones Review

Loads of performance for a reasonable price

$49.00
7.2 score Tested by Experts
  • The Shure SE112 is better than 75% of the headphones we tested.
  • It is better than 71% of the headphones we have tested under $100.
  • It is better than 62% of the in-ear headphones we have tested.
  • This graph shows the Shure SE112's score compared to other headphones we tested. Learn more.
# of headphones Product Score This graph shows the Shure SE112’s score compared to other headphones we tested.
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This year, we've found no shortage of dynamite deals on in-ear headphones. From sleek design, to pleasing price tags, to premium performance, there are piles of products to choose from in this category.

Shure's SE112 Sound Isolating headphones (MSRP $49) aren't best in show, but they deserve special mention anyway. Travelers won't find a microphone or remote with this in-ear headset, and its noise isolation is average at best, but those are the only big complaints I have about the high-performing SE112.

The Audio

Bass-forward, distortion-free listening

In a word, the SE112 faced a slew of tests in our audio lab and survived to tell the tale. This isn't the best performance I've measured all year, but it's definitely toward the top of the heap.

Aside from the occasional abrasive high notes, there really isn't much to shake your fist at here.

The bump bump bump of low-down tones on bass and kick are really showcased. Happily, so is most everything else. Too often, overly prominent bass comes at the expense of details in the middle and high end, but the SE112 does a decent job of maintaining proper emphasis throughout. Generally speaking, middle and upper notes on vocals, brass, strings, and everything else are perfectly audible. If anything, certain high notes sound too loud here and there—which will have you ticking down volume to keep from wincing at a cymbal's tsh tsh tsh. In a word, the SE112 produces very full, detail-rich sound.

Best of all, aside from the occasional abrasive high notes, there really isn't much to shake your fist at here: The headphones balance volume evenly between the left and right speakers, and I couldn't find even a sprinkle of audible distortion.

The SE112 tested well in terms of noise blocking—but not as well as you'd think for a product that includes the phrase "Sound Isolating" in its title.

The SE112 tested well in terms of noise blocking, too—but not as well as you'd think for a product that includes the phrase "Sound Isolating" in its title. To put it bluntly, the SE112 has absolutely nothing on AKG's K323 XS model. Where the SE112 blocks a decent amount of middle and high-pitched outside noise, the XS absolutely obliterates external sound.

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The Outfit

A demure ensemble

Aside from a few useful extras, Shure's SE112 takes a very modest approach to design. You won't find anything flashy or extravagant here. The product's gray plastic and black, rubber accents make for a very muted scheme.

Busy users won't find such luxuries as a microphone or remote control.

Lightweight and portable, this headset is easy to take on the road, but unfortunately, busy users won't find such luxuries as a microphone or remote control. That's a shame—for nearly 50 dollars, many will likely resent this omission. The cable seems quite durable, though, and Shure includes a drawstring carry case for added protection during transport.

While you won't find a variety of shapes, the SE112 in-ears do include three speaker sleeves in small, medium, and large sizes (I found myself longing for extra small). Users will also notice a tiny cleaning tool, which makes clearing out lint and other unwanted dirt from each speaker a much easier task.

Comparable Products

Before you buy the Shure SE112, take a look at these other headphones.

The Bottom Line

High performance you can reach

With big, balanced sound, decent isolation, and distortion-free audio, Shure's SE112 (MSRP $49) in-ear headphones make a convincing case for themselves. The quality parts and extra sleeve sizes make the deal even more attractive.

Alternatives are never far. Panasonic's dirt-cheap RP-TCM125 is made with cheap materials, but its dynamite sound quality bites enthusiastically at the heels of these Shures; id America offers a product with cooler extras and similar performance; and perhaps most fearsome of all is JBL's excellent Synchros S200i model.

Still, there's no denying that these sub $50 Shure headphones are toward the top of the dog pile—that's simply where you wind up with great audio and quality parts.

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