headphones
Expert Score
7.7

Polk Audio Buckle Headphones Review

They might miss a couple performance hurdles, but these buckles hold up their end of the bargain.

October 30, 2014
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Polk is well known for its speaker systems, but did you know that the company also makes headphones? The Polk Audio Buckle (MSRP $249.95) is one such specimen, so-named for its belt-imitating design.

The Buckles have a lot going for them: A unique design, sturdy parts, a comfortable fit, and decent audio quality. That's not to say there aren't any drawbacks. In our lab tests I found the headphones drastically under-emphasized musical elements and bass distortion, which is a shame given how pricey these are.

While they're not the créme de la créme of high-end audio—you can find our favorites for about the same price—the Buckles are only around $146 online. Even beyond pure price vs. performance considerations, the design alone is a breath of fresh air compared to the mass of anonymous all-black over-ears that clutter the market.

The Outfit

A heavy-duty design that's nevertheless quite comfortable

You might not be crazy about the "belt buckle" look, but there's no denying it's unique. The sturdy brown band is lined with neat stitching along either side, joining the ear-cups via boxy silver buckles made of a cool-to-the-touch, matte-finished metal. The ear cups are backed in brown plastic that transitions into cushy, creme-colored pads. It's a wholly unique look unlike any other headphones on the market.

Polk-Buckle-General.jpg
The heavy-duty "buckle" design makes these over-ears heavier than average, but if pays off in the durability department.

The build quality is obvious from their sturdy design and firm clamping force, but with all that hardware the Buckles do stray a little onto the heavy side. They're comfortable despite this, though, and even after an hour of listening I'm happy they're on my head. But over a long-haul flight or similar long-term listening session the weight difference compared to something like the Sony MDR-7506 is notable. You'll also never forget that you're wearing them, like you can with the lighter Sony cans.

The Buckle make use of a detachable brown cable that's wrapped in heavy-duty rubber. The flex point at the jack is especially well-protected; it's one of the sturdiest I've seen this year and it screams durability. In the box you'll also find a 3.5mm to quarter-inch adapter and a cream-colored carrying pouch with a leather pull cord.

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Despite their firm clamping force, the Buckles are quite comfortable. Creme-colored ear pads provide plenty of cushy goodness for long-term listening.

Many new headphones feature a three-button controller somewhere along the cable, but these have a round, grooved selector on the back of the right ear cup instead. The selector mimics a traditional controller: Push it to take/end calls or skip through tracks in a playlist, and roll it up/down to change volume. It's a unique approach, but it's a little esoteric and will require some getting used to.

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The Audio

Strong overall performance, but with a couple of flaws

The Buckles sound good, but they're not perfect. Music receives subtle treatment, with gentle emphasis on bass and treble tones. There's a good amount of clarity and balance between high, mid, and low frequencies, but harder-to-hear elements in the upper-mid range are under-emphasized, making them almost invisible to the ear. This drop in emphasis is the only real flaw in the audio quality, and it'll be pretty hard to hear unless you're attempting professional studio mixing.

Harder-to-hear elements in the upper-mid range are under-emphasized, making them almost invisible to the ear. Tweet It

Likewise, I measured very little by way of audible distortion, though the deepest bass elements don't always come out entirely clean. For the price, we'd prefer if the Buckles had no distorted notes or clipped frequencies, but it's a minor problem. Likewise, the Buckles exhibit unevenness in the volume balance between each speaker. Some notes are louder in the left speaker than the right, and vice versa. Neither of these issues are huge problems, but they're flaws that plenty of $200 headphones manage to avoid.

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The Buckles feature a bass-forward because they gently emphasize mid-tone and treble frequencies by comparison, which makes some upper mid-range frequencies difficult to hear.

For over-ear headphones, I'm impressed with how little sound the Buckles leak. I've been blasting everything from Metallica to Daft Punk to Rush while reviewing these cans, and none of my co-workers have asked me to turn it down or seem to be judging my musical selections. Despite their excellent lack of leakage, though, the Buckles don't block noise on the level of active cancelers or in-ear style headphones. You'll still hear most of the outside world around you, though really high-pitched stuff is dampened considerably.

Overall, this is decent performance, but it'll only blow you away if you're not familiar with high-end audio. Amongst the upper echelon of consumer-level over-ear headphones the Buckles sound pleasantly subtle, but at a small cost to finer details.

The Verdict

Not just another notch on your belt

The Polk Audio Buckles feature a design that is a welcome departure from the norm, and the company has clearly combined its knowledge of free-standing speakers with an eye for design and detail.

The sound quality here is certainly not audiophile-grade, but it's hardly something worth complaining about. Subtle bass presentation and flat mid-tone emphasis make for a healthy balance between musical layers—if it weren't for the under-emphasis of mid-high range notes, this would be blue-ribbon sound.

Sure, it might feel a little bit weird to wear a belt on your head, but don't knock it 'til you've tried it. Tweet It

On the design side, everything's win-win. The Buckles are heavier than the average over-ears, but they make up for it with incredibly durable, high-quality materials and a unique look that's unlike anything else on the market. Just know that you're paying a small markup for the design, with some cheaper over-ears on the market outpointing the Buckles on audio quality.

In the end, these are a fine choice if you like the style, don't mind spending a bit more than is absolutely necessary, and aren't obsessed with perfect audio fidelity. Sure, it might feel a little bit weird to wear a belt on your head, but don't knock it 'til you've tried it.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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